Psychological and Sociological barriers to proper eating

It is not mine, it is my mother’s fault I’m fat1409851302d_cookie

Over eating goes back to primitive times.  Primeval man had no way to maintain or store fresh meat.  The storage of meat through the use of salting goes back centuries.  Salting removes the water content and turns meat into a storable form of, tasteless shoe leather.  The killing of livestock was timed around the eating and use of the animal.  Societies had feasting ceremonies where copious amounts of animal flesh were consumed over a period of days.  These aforementioned feasting ceremonies are what we call holidays.  Along with the gluttonous consumption of food came the overzealous drinking of alcoholic beverages.  How could one celebrate without a good “buzz” on?

Starting to see how overindulgence might be programmed into our DNA, as socially expected behavior.  When we were children and we were “good” what did our parents, or grandparents give us in reward?  Cookies or candies were given to us reinforcing our socially accepted “good” behavior.  When we were children if we were “bad” we wouldn’t get any desserts, for sweets only were for “good” children.  The reward system for impressionable young minds is intrinsically meshed into eating high sugar and high calorie treats.  Santa only brings good children stockings full of candy canes and ginger bread men.

Now that we know why we are so psychologically and possibly genetically scarred what do we do?  When someone has a substance abuse problem such as drugs or alcohol they are told to stay away from their object of addiction.  When someone has a problem with their relationship with food they are advised to indulge in their addictive behavior anywhere from three to five times a day.  The individuals with food addiction have to limit their amounts of intake to that which is considered reasonable.  This type of protocol would be wrought in failure in the dealings of other addictive substance behavior modification

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