• 0 Overcoming Changed Training Capabilities

    • by Administrator
    • 26-04-2022
    0.00 of 0 votes

    There are times when one's training and their very way of life is drastically changed. These life changing events can be the result of things happening in our world and our reactions to them. There are also internal disruptions. Medical events can change our ability to train at previous levels. The athlete needs to deal with the psychological consequences that develop as an internal reaction to this training trauma.   These are challenging times to get past and move forward from. The competitive athlete within us has always pushed ourselves to exceed previous levels of personal performance. We accept nothing but giving our very best," leaving nothing "on the table." Constantly striving to be better, faster, stronger. Whatever the game was, second place loses first.   Within the last nine months, my life has been forever changed. Toward the end of last August, I went to my cardiologist to discuss the statin that I was presently taking. While at the cardiologist's, I was informed that my resting pulse was 165 bpm and that I was experiencing atrial fibrillations. The following day, I was at Valley Hospital's emergency room. As they were wheeling me through the doors, I commented to Caroline, "I hope this isn't a life-changing event." The doctors who worked on me initially attempted to cardio convert me. This procedure involves electrically shocking the heart back to sinus (regular) mode. This procedure failed.   They then proceeded to move forward with cardiac ablation. My body was very beaten up. I believe I had been in cardiac dysrhythmia for almost three months. My reaction to the injectable beta-blocker in conjunction with the anesthesia was not good. They had also had not taken the precautions necessary to handle a patient with asthma.   I experienced heart, renal and pulmonary failure. I almost died in the operating room. I was then transferred to critical care during the second day in C.C.U. I developed sepsis from a staff infection that must have been acquired while in the hospital. I had a bluishgreen skin color. My temperature rose to 104.3. I was intubated and put into a coma-like state.   My dear Caroline was constantly at my side, and I could feel her love every morning when they brought me out of my coma-like state for a few moments. I felt her love while I was heavily sedated and slept.   Being Irish and a bodybuilder, I was just too thick-headed to die.   I rehabbed myself to the point of decent fitness and muscularity. The doctors' investigation of what brought about my almost death five months prior concluded that I had a severely calcified aortic valve. Within a month, I had open-heart surgery at Weil Cornell hospital. Then a month later, it was determined that I needed to have a cardiac ablation to stabilize my atrial fibrillation further.   I had missed or had to alter 8 months of training. My body and psyche had had changed in appearance and had to further adapt to the changed needs and capabilities of the moment. The medications I was taking was making me tired and listless. There were many times when going down the stairs to the gym or going on my recumbent bike were beyond my physical and mental capabilities.   I knew that it was extremely important to raise my cardiovascular capabilities. The optimal level of heart function was needed for my health and longevity. I did not like how I looked in the mirror, to raise my sense of self I needed to put back some muscle. My training possibilities had expanded but were still greatly limited regarding how, and how much I lifted. I used to deadlift 400 lbs. I was making progress deadlifting 150 lbs. Presently I can bench press the 50 lb. dumbbells for eight reps in contrast to the 75 lb. dumbbells for 10. I need to lift safely. My chest was cut open and wired back together 13 weeks ago.   My training methods and goals have been forever altered. The game changes when the rules change. Learning from our experiences is a basic measure of intelligence. These experiences left me a very changed man. I now have a very different outlook of the world. I am far more understanding of people and the differences that may lie between us.   I was also physically changed from 9 months of significantly reduced physicality. I had lost 20 pounds, a large portion of my muscle, from my lack of weight training. I have gained back 5 pounds I am fighting every day, regardless of how I feel, to do my cardio and get in my lifting. I know my bodybuilding competition days are behind me. I will get back in shape, but my heavy lifting days are behind me. I will have to settle on not being the biggest guy in the room but rather the nicest.   My road goes on...   Sometimes staying in the race is secondary to winning the race...

  • 0 Goal Setting and Weight Loss

    • by Administrator
    • 10-12-2021
    0.00 of 0 votes

    Goal setting is a critical strategy in changing your diet and physical activity behavior The rate of obesity is increasing. A substantial body of research links poor diet and physical activity habits to obesity and chronic diseases.  Producing sustainable dietary and physical activity behavior change to influence this rate of obesity is an ongoing challenge. Research shows that the most effective behavior changes from nutrition education interventions take place when the interventions are behaviorally focused and theory-driven.  The Social Cognitive Theory, well known and widely used for understanding and researching behavior change, specifies goal setting as a key strategy - Lee, Locke, and Latham define a goal as ‘‘that which one wants to accomplish; it concerns a valued, future end state.” Goal setting is a significant facilitator of behavior change. Setting specific goals provides a potential strategy for organizing nutrition and physical activity information and skills into practical and manageable steps. I am presently pursuing my Masters of Science degree in Sport Psychology. I possess over 5,000 hours of hands-on experience in Personal Training and Sports Conditioning.  I’m a credible source of information and expertise, ready to design and implement an exercise and weight loss program tailored to you.   Call or email me to schedule your complimentary first session and let’s get started!  In-person and virtual sessions are available.

  • 0 Where did those Covid pounds come from

    • by Administrator
    • 24-06-2021
    5.00 of 1 votes

    Those extra pounds that have accumulated on your butt, stomach and legs are not the result of a viral infection. The self-inflicted detachment that people have made from society due to Covid has greatly curtailed their activities. Going to the store, rushing to the bank, going out with your friends, moving the body from here to there burns calories. This lack of reduction in burnt calories accumulates body fat. This weight gain can be further attenuated with the response of the stress hormone cortisol which wreaks havoc on the endocrine system. Your body does not care how it looks, it just wants to survive. Cortisol starts shutting down the machinery. Shut off all peripheral systems, they are using energy that may be desperately needed for a possible attack. Cortisol along with epinephrine and adrenaline are your three stress hormones.    Don’t blame all of this weight on cortisol. and your activity levels. Much of these accumulated calories you have ingested. Sitting around your home puts you in close proximity to food sources. The hundred calorie snack here and hundred calorie snack there if done two times a day equals 200 calories daily approximately 6,000 calories monthly. One pound of body fat requires about 3500 extra calories to be ingested. Doing the math !.71 pounds of fat a month times 15 months equals 25 extra pounds of fat. 

  • 0 Motivation

    • by Administrator
    • 25-05-2021
    0.00 of 0 votes

    Motivation is something that, at times, can be pretty elusive. Sometimes it can be challenging to get yourself to the gym, even if it is walking downstairs to your home gym. It's best to find intrinsic means to motivate. It is about finding things that are important to you to get you going. They shouldn't be goals that are societally based. They should be about goals that fulfill your inner needs, Telling yourself that you want to lose weight because you want to be more aesthetically pleasing may not be the proper approach. Tell yourself that you're losing weight because you wish to be more healthy and more vibrant. Go to the gym and work out because it makes you feel good and will help you function better. Choose better food choices because it increases your feelings of health. Having goals is essential. Having obtainable short-term goals is imperative for long-term success. If the goals we set are too difficult to achieve, we run the risk of failure indeed. Failure is counterproductive to feelings of self-efficacy. It is hard to accomplish anything if we don't believe in ourselves